Resources Roundup

 

Social distancing, medieval style: keeping 2m apart with the help of a lance; Verdun Breviary, Bibliothèque-Discothèque Intercommunale de Verdun

The Covid-19 lockdown has certainly lasted longer than I had anticipated when I posted my last website entry. But amidst all the sadness and gloom there have been some great patches of light and one of those has been the generosity of individuals and organisations in sharing collections care information and advice.

I have tried to keep on top of these for the benefit of the heritage community through my various sector roles as well as for my clients and thought it would be useful to bring them together in a single spreadsheet.  I have also tried to focus on information that will be helpful for small or medium sized institutions that may not have expansive resources to deal with the impact of the virus or the consequences of reopening services. I hope you find the attached helpful – the latest update is always available here, and the date of the last version is given below the link.

As always, stay safe and well, and if you need any help or advice please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

2020_VSACR_COVID_19_ResourcesRoundup_V10

This version added 12 July 2020

All manner of things will be well

In these incredibly strange and increasingly difficult times, I just wanted to extend my best wishes to all my clients, both present and past, and I hope you are all well and safe.

The future for the heritage sector is going to be a bit bumpy in the short term I fear, particularly those who rely on visitor income, and I am committed to helping all my clients in whatever way I can to support them and their objects and collections to get through this tough time, both during and after the current situation has passed. If you have any concerns about your collection in this closed period please do not hesitate to get in touch; as always I will be very happy to help you.

Meanwhile work continues here at the bench. I am just completing the repairs to a very damaged document that has a fantastic back story. This mid C17th account book survived the Great Fire of London in 1666 only to be blown up when in storage during the Second World War. With true grit, it was still not beaten and held itself together until being scheduled for conservation through the generosity of a grant from NMCT.  The main damage has been caused, I suspect, by the water used to extinguish the fire, with extensive staining, mould softening and losses. The following image shows the extent of the damage to  some of the most effected leaves.

Iron gall ink areas and those most damaged by mould were supported with remoistenable tissue, using gelatin as an adhesive. Infills were made only where necessary: I am not trying to restore the item but support it for use in research and display in its current condition. After this, the textblock will be sewn on alum tawed supports and given a smart and durable handmade paper cover.

A phoenix rising from the ashes. A lesson of hope for our time, perhaps?

 

With thanks to The Salters’ Company Archives for allowing me to use the image

 

Look, write, say

This year has been filled with looking, writing and talking, three things I enjoy very much indeed. I have had several very interesting assessment projects, ranging from a gorgeous collection of medieval and early modern European manuscript fragments to an incredibly complete representation of arts and crafts printing heritage in a collection based on the output of the Essex House Press.  Looking inevitably precedes writing, and the resulting reports on all these great projects must run to many thousands of words of advice.

Talking this year has involved several presentations, most recently to the members of the Royal Philatelic Society of London on their Perkins Bacon collection of letter books. This vital and complete record of early stamp history and printing on an international level was very difficult to access  due to the damaged condition of the material, and is currently undergoing conservation with the generous support of the National Manuscripts Conservation Trust.

A project that is just drawing to a close – and one that will deserve a post all of its own – is the extensive work I have undertaken on the Oliver Messel Archive for the University of Bristol’s Theatre Collection. This has been such a wonderful project to conserve, and centres on a series of evocative photograph albums detailing Messel’s early life and work as a theatre designer and an incredible collection of architectural plans of his later interests as an interior designer.  As there are to be no spoilers for the longer post at the end of the project I will leave it at that for now, with one small tantalising example of Messel’s output – who would not want to live in a house like this?

 

My thanks to the Royal Philatelic Society of London and the Theatre Collection for kindly allowing me to use these images. 

 

Access all areas

Conservation is rarely undertaken without future use being the driving force. It is usually dictated by the need to access the information an object contains, but being prevented from doing so by its overall poor condition or the stability of individual components such as the sewing structure or the media. The first question I ask when assessing objects for conservation is often

How will the item or collection be used?

The treatment is guided by the response, with different approaches being taken for say, stabilisation for cataloguing and digitisation or extended term storage with occasional future use to an object that will be regularly handled or is scheduled for display. But in the end it all comes down to conservation being the means of improving access to an object. 

 

 

 

 

 

This was certainly the case for an impressive archive item from the St Bartholomew’s Hospital collections that has just been conserved. Measuring almost a metre in height and over a metre in width and dated 1867, this tracing paper plan of the hospital’s laboratory equipment is a wonderfully evocative object, showing the inner workings of a state of the art hospital, nineteenth century style. Detailing autoclave cauldrons, mechanised stirrers, twisted pipework and complex pulley and winch mechanisms, the delicate accuracy of the ink and possibly watercolour drawing was remarkable. Perhaps it was created to introduce or promote a model for modern hospital practice at the time but in 2018 looks quaintly archaic and more than a little steampunk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use and storage over the intervening 150 years had taken its toll, with the object now in two main sections and several loosely attached or detached sections around the edges.  The surface dirt accumulations on the exposed surfaces of the object were also problematic for safe handling, with cross contamination being a significant risk. At some stage it was backed with stiff, thick wove paper and rolled. It is probably this rolling that caused the main tear up the length of the object, as the edge peaked and tore as it was being unrolled. Some of the original tracing paper had chipped away from the torn edges, showing the much lighter backing paper behind to high visual contrast with the darker toned tracing paper. This backing, although less than ideal and overly sturdy for the object, has probably saved the very fragile tracing itself. The fierce curl that the relatively more rigid backing had created from being rolled meant that the tracing could not be handled safely and as such was unable to be used for research or display.

Tracing paper is extremely sensitive to moisture, so lengthy humidification to flatten was not an option. After an extended period of weighting to reduce the curl, minimal humidification was able to be used to flatten the object almost completely. Unobtrusive conservation using very thin strips of toned Japanese paper on the recto and naturally coloured on the verso has reduced the aesthetic impact of the backing below. This and supported storage in a melinex sleeve in a board folder has allowed the full joy of this object to be revealed, restoring its status as being in a fit state for production for use and research once more.

 

My thanks to Barts Health NHS Trust Archives for allowing the use of the treatment images

Back to the Near East with TE Lawrence

Following on from my recent posts on the conservation of David Roberts’ travels in the near east, I return to that region but this time in the company of TE Lawrence.

I have recently written a piece for the Jesus College, Oxford college record on the work I have undertaken over the years to conserve and preserve TE Lawrence’s undergraduate thesis, and which has just been posted on the college’s library and archives blog.

This wonderful object has been a constant thread through my professional career and it was a great privilege to lead the project to create two facsimile copies in 2017.
The project was a strong collaboration between conservator, curator, digital photographer and box maker to create a truly tactile and dynamic surrogate, and bring back Lawrence’s lively interpretation of his study travels in Syria in 1909 to the digital copy.

You can read the piece on the library and archives blog by following this link: https://jesuslibraries.wordpress.com/…/…/19/f-for-facsimile/

Image included by kind permission of Jesus College Oxford